ZERO WASTE HOME BOOK

adminComment(0)
    Contents:

download Zero Waste Home: The Ultimate Guide to Simplifying Your Life by Bea Johnson (ISBN: ) from site's Book Store. Everyday low prices. download Zero Waste Home: The Ultimate Guide to Simplifying Your Life by Reducing Your Waste by Bea Johnson (ISBN: ) from site's Book Store. “There was a time when nobody knew what “zero waste” meant, but since Bea Johnson published her seminal book, the phrase has become mainstream.”.


Zero Waste Home Book

Author:JERAMY SHARABI
Language:English, Arabic, Hindi
Country:Honduras
Genre:Biography
Pages:780
Published (Last):29.05.2016
ISBN:843-3-32395-879-5
ePub File Size:29.87 MB
PDF File Size:8.85 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Registration Required]
Downloads:44025
Uploaded by: RANDI

Zero Waste Home book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Part inspirational story of Bea Johnson (the “Priestess of Waste-F. Zero Waste Home is the ultimate guide to simplified, sustainable living from Bea Johnson, 'the priestess of waste-free living' (The New York. Bea Johnson has inspired millions of people worldwide with her stylish, waste- free life. She reduced her household waste to an astonishing one litre per year.

Nov 05, Amy marked it as abandoned. I feel as though I must first earn some street cred before I go any further: However when the author suggested saving energy by not preheating your oven I almost put the book back into my library bag unfinished.

I didn't though because even though as a home cook I found that to be a silly way of saving 4 cents I figured the bo I feel as though I must first earn some street cred before I go any further: I didn't though because even though as a home cook I found that to be a silly way of saving 4 cents I figured the book would still have some valuable information. Then she suggested I start shaving my legs with a straight razor I was done.

This book went back to the library unfinished. Sorry lady. View 1 comment. Anyone trying to live a little bit more sustainably. Investigation is required to check whether some of this stuff should be tried… i. For what it's worth, many recipes are not necessary to live zero waste. I won't be adopting any of the makeup recipes, for example, because I don't wear make up anyway.

Depends on what is important to you. There are also a lot of probably unintentionally omitted privileges about how much easier it seems to carry out her lifestyle in the city she lives in: Mill Valley, which seems to have a reputation for facilitating greener living.

This is an unusual environment globally and for the United States where there is a communal desire and technological ability and infrastructure in place to help people to live more sustainably if they want to That said , I don't think the absence of this odd living arrangement makes it impossible to at least attempt and certainly not to implement a lot of the thinking here elsewhere.

I equally don't think she should be written off because of her short-sightedness in this area. Overall, the best takeaway is really the intentionality and awareness of the lifestyle and having the mentality of thinking about the lifespan of products we use and about the impact of the way we live.

Similar Products

If you already think about this stuff and act accordingly and don't find it motivating to read things on the subject that might not be new to you, you may not get much from this book. If you're already coming at it with cynicism, judgement and contempt, it might be better not picking it up at all Make no mistake, oftentimes Johnson post- and present-Zero Waste and I seem to live in totally different universes, but there are a lot of people who live like she used to and I think it's impressive that she has managed to do a total on her obscenely materialist lifestyle for the good of the planet.

It shows that just about anyone can do a lot to reduce their waste and still live well or possibly better than they did before.

And I really like Johnson's efforts to make everything as accessible as possible. Her mantra of doing the "5 Rs" in order is a good rule of thumb that's easy for those new to Zero Waste to follow: Refuse what you do not need.

Reduce what you do need.

download for others

Reuse by using reusables. Recycle what you cannot refuse, reduce, or reuse. Rot compost the rest. I have a lot more opinions about specific ideas or attitudes in the book but, overall, despite the fact that much of this information is available for free online including on Johnson's website and she talks about much of what is in the book in her various speeches which can be found online, I do think this book is a worthwhile download. It provides a good general reference discussing a wide range of areas like how to be Zero Waste in the kitchen, bathroom, at work, with kids, when travelling, etc.

There will always be tricky little bits that are peculiar to different people's lives, but I think this book pretty thoroughly discusses how to make different aspects of one's life Zero Waste if not at least giving a great starting point for just about all situations. You might not use every thing in this book, but there will be loads you can take away and implement in your life. Obviously, nothing happens overnight and Johnson tries to emphasise that making any effort at all is better than nothing, but there's always more that everyone can do.

And there's no need for the journey to living more sustainably to be filled with pressure or guilt. Do it for you. Do it for the planet. Take it one step at a time. And remember how much you can actually do as an individual. Although I tend not to like reading books over pages on screen, I bought the ebook because how could I not? What did I learned from this book?

If you live your American Dream TM in a giant house, making crap loads of money while having almost unlimited free time, then you can significantly reduce your waste output and as by byproduct reduce your expenses and gain some free time. Perhaps it's because I don't live in USA and my budget is tight, but the small-but-high-impact changes like not using disposable dishes have been always part of my life, so the other changes like make everythi What did I learned from this book?

Perhaps it's because I don't live in USA and my budget is tight, but the small-but-high-impact changes like not using disposable dishes have been always part of my life, so the other changes like make everything you can instead of downloading it are just not realistic -- I just don't have so much free time and money.

And also, I quite like my friends. And the whole snobish sound of the book Zero-waste alternative to eye-lens? Eye surgery!

Luckily, I have some sort of "minimal waste" deeply rooted, otherwise I would tart producing waste just because of the sound of the book. Oct 27, Stacia rated it really liked it Recommends it for: I love this book. Rather than the recycle mantra we all know, Johnson urges much more proactivity with these 5 Rs: Both of those items were things that I, personally, would have never even considered during a cull, so I found it eye-opening to see her list of what didn't make it -- making me see what we have in a new light.

So, it even appealed to me on an editorial level. I guess I noticed it because in that area, this book is definitely heads above others books of similar ilk. I see Bea Johnson as being that type of person. Jan 07, Cherie In the Dooryard rated it it was ok. I read the author's blog and find that she constantly challenges my thinking regarding waste. Is she extreme?

Oh yes. And she knows it and admits it, declaring that she sees herself as the experimenter in order to save everyone else the time of figuring it out.

So I was pre-disposed to be interested in this book. Just no. She's a blogger, not a writer or researcher, and it shows. There was a lot more that could have been done here in terms of making the waste reduction argument an I read the author's blog and find that she constantly challenges my thinking regarding waste.

There was a lot more that could have been done here in terms of making the waste reduction argument and setting the call to action and she missed it all in favor of forced alphabetized lists of tips.

But I will say He's remembering to bring the reusable grocery bags and thinking about what we download at the store. So it serves that purpose. Just read the blog. View all 3 comments.

Oct 28, Julie rated it liked it. I definitely admire a woman on a mission. And it's always nice to read a missive by someone with even more crazy-out-there ideas than my own. The problem with this book for me was that the simplicity goal and the zero-waste goal are two entirely different things, and I can't quite see how to implement them without contradiction. How am I supposed to get my wardrobe down to, like, 25 pieces total, for example, without getting rid of basically everything I own and then downloading those 25 magical I definitely admire a woman on a mission.

How am I supposed to get my wardrobe down to, like, 25 pieces total, for example, without getting rid of basically everything I own and then downloading those 25 magical high-quality, neutral-colored, super-versatile pieces?

Wouldn't I just be downloading 25 things I didn't need, since I already have a closet full of clothes right now? I know this sounds like nitpicking, but I had similar problems with maybe half of her suggestions. And of the half that didn't frustrate or annoy me in some way, I can see myself actually implementing maybe half of those. Still, I guess that's a bit less trash heading to the landfill, and that's a step in the right direction.

View 2 comments. It takes a lot of money to produce no waste. The most useful thing I took from this was to use colouring pencils instead of highlighters.

I have no clue how the author thinks poor people live. Whatever floats your boat I guess, but most normal and most cash strapped people could not afford to live like this regardless of how much money she thinks you save. Sep 15, Panda Incognito rated it did not like it Shelves: Earlier this summer, some friends and I talked about cults. One friend told another, "You'd be in the zero-waste cult," and we all thought this was hilarious.

Now that I've read this book, I no longer find it facetious to conflate zero-waste living with cult membership. It requires a level of religious devotion to take the zero-waste lifestyle as far as this lady does, and Earlier this summer, some friends and I talked about cults. It requires a level of religious devotion to take the zero-waste lifestyle as far as this lady does, and although it clearly works for her life and interests, this book may turn normal people off from zero-waste living, because she makes the lifestyle seem obsessive-compulsive, unsustainable, and potentially damaging to social relationships.

Also, despite all her ravings about how her family saves so much money and lives a far more simple life, one needs to live in a fairly affluent area to have access to all of the resources she has, and there is nothing simple about this lifestyle. As I tweeted after finding one of the recipes in this book, "Going zero waste saves the planet!! Restores humanity!! Also here is a time-consuming recipe to set almonds on fire and grind them up into eye shadow!! However, even though she does advocate peeing into your compost or a citrus plant, many of the recommendations in this book actually have merit.

She gives lots of ideas for how to reject consumerism, download in bulk, and deal with holidays. Many authors like this say, "Prioritize experiences, not material gifts!

She provides a whole list of potential ideas, and even though they wouldn't all work for everyone, it's clear that she lives this out, and isn't just spouting platitudes. She gives lots of handy household trips and tricks, and has good advice for how to get rid of items you already have without putting them in the landfill. The most valuable thing I learned from this book is that Goodwill accepts bags of worn-out clothes and fabric scraps destined for the landfill.

Goodwill sells these items to textile recyclers, who grind the fabric down for reuse in other products. However, even though she has great information about resources, many of her personal ideas for waste reduction require so many extra steps and so much effort that they hardly seem worthwhile.

This book is also full of laughable contradictions, even on the same page. She tells you that when you ship something, you should reuse an old box, but then she tells you to avoid sticker or paper labels, and to write directly on the box.

Also, even though this author goes to very real and commendable lengths to avoid judgment, encouraging people to do what is right for them without trying to force it on all their friends and family, she is oblivious to how privileged she is. She never once acknowledges that people in highly concentrated, poverty-stricken urban areas often depend upon packaged and processed foods, since transportation costs for produce can make it prohibitively expensive in those areas.

She is also so sanctimonious about family size that I dropped my rating from three stars to one. Firstly, when she talks about how much the population has expanded over past generations, she makes it sound like this is because people are running around making babies too often, when in reality, the population has expanded because mortality rates have lowered and standards of living have greatly improved.

She doesn't cite her statistics, and nor does she explain why things have changed, and that's a very poor foundation to begin with. Secondly, even though she can talk piously about birth control all she wants, I know and love large families, and how DARE she suggest that every additional child is a waste of space and resources.

I know that using birth control to eliminate the possibility of conception is very different than exterminating existent lives, but this woman is presuming authority not only over what you should do with your waste, or what you should download at the grocery store, but over what human beings should exist in the world and be part of your family.

Some of my best friends are members of large families, and parents often raise multiple children with the hope that these kids can grow up to change the world. I was willing to look past so many irritants and so much silliness to learn helpful household and environmental practices, but as soon as she told me that the world would be better off without some of my best friends, I was DONE.

I am OUT. Goodbye, Priestess of Waste-Free Living. You can pursue your obsessive waste-reducing lifestyle while I enjoy the things that actually matter in life. Oct 28, Aubrey rated it it was amazing. This past half a year or so we've been living full-time on the road in a house on wheels. We've seen such beautiful places with landscapes varying from mountainous depths filled with elk and reindeer, the unique colors of the desert to a flatter place here in Florida covered in lakes and a wide array of birds.

I love nature. I love this planet and I want to keep it beautiful.

Unfortunately, we are trashing it without acknowledgment for our waste and actions. Granted, the planet will always be he This past half a year or so we've been living full-time on the road in a house on wheels.

Granted, the planet will always be here. It is ourselves we are dooming to extinction, but we're taking others down with us. We're depleting the oceans with our waste, the bees and dirt with our pesticides, our air with our poor choices of what we eat. Since roughly I have made strides to live more sustainably.

And now, knowing there is always more I can do, I'm pleased to come across books like this and people like Bea who are showing what is possible. Even if viewed as extreme, it's no sweat off my back because I've always been viewed as extreme.

To me, extreme is what we are doing to the planet and how often we are willing to look away and not take responsibility. All it takes are little actions that build up to being great things. So, I now strive to live as plastic and completely waste free as I can. And boy has it been liberating and enlightening all the same.

I'm excited for this next chapter and hope more consider living with less waste, a smaller impact but a greater and more mindful heart. Oct 17, KDV rated it liked it Shelves: I like reading books like this and usually find them motivating even if not all of the advice applies to me.

There are some good ideas in this one.

Zero Waste Home : The Ultimate Guide to Simplifying Your Life by Reducing Your Waste

But, yes, like other reviewers have pointed out, the author is kind of insufferable. Most of her personal stories are thinly-veiled humblebrags. Like the time she got a short hair cut to reduce her shampoo use, but it did nothing for her face and a magazine camera crew came to photograph her and her family!

Oh no! Is this story supposed to convey hu I like reading books like this and usually find them motivating even if not all of the advice applies to me. Is this story supposed to convey humility?

Some of the advice is also quite ridiculous. Like having makeup tattooed on your face instead of downloading cosmetics Jesus Christ! She also references flying a lot with no mention of the environmental impact unless I missed that , and she's not even vegan, so you know she's really just a big ol' poser. She also rails against food processors. How does she make hummus???? Tout y passe: Un livre fort utile en ces temps de prise de conscience environnementale.

Cinco estrelas para um livro inspirador. Pode parecer radical. Recusar, Reduzir, Reutilizar, Reciclar e Compostar para sermos mais livres e mais felizes. Para Ser em vez Cinco estrelas para um livro inspirador. Para Ser em vez de Ter. Feb 27, Ev rated it it was ok. Ok ok. I feel kind of cruel for rating this a book a two, as it's chock-full of tips to pare down on wasteful habits. But, I couldn't take it seriously: I substitute cornstarch sold in bulk for dry shampoo.

I substitute cornstarch sold in bulk for dry shampoo Enjoy the added volume! Waxing with sugar originated in ancient Egypt and is still used in Arab countries today. Also referred to as halawa meaning 'sweet' , it can be a dessert or a great alternative for those adept at waxing! It is tricky but well worth the effort. Acid washes and tie-dye rainbows are restrictive; they cannot be dressed up for a formal event.

I'm kind of curious to prove her wrong. Refusing requires tremendous courage, but kids build lasting confidence when they meet challenges like this, and they become examples for others. Our boys find it difficult to say no to free candy, but they have learned Trick-or-Treating on Halloween -- "I am not at all against the trick-or-treat tradition.

The freebies are, after all, the force behind consistent turnouts. Additionally, frustrations pile up pretty quickly when you start trying to change. Want to stop junk mail? Good luck if you don't own your home. Same goes for composting if you don't have a city that does it for you.

Recycling for renters is a colossal pain in my town, but I try to buddy up that errand when I can. You just have to be that much more organized, and admittedly, that takes more effort. Johnson has been brutally criticized by readers all across the United States -- saying that she is just a "housewife with too much time on her hands" -- and it's this kind of criticism I find most repellent.

Insert conversation about the post-feminist "New Motherhood" and classism here. Anyway, reading her blog proves that this is nothing of the sort she runs her own business, and she and her husband are both active participants in this no-waste experiment. She spearheaded a major environmental call to action! She's a key figure in the movement!People look at it like its a rudimentary and I'm constantly asked "How don't you cut yourself!? An attempt at going zero waste starts with small changes.

Today, Bea, her husband, Scott, and their two young sons produce just one quart of garbage a year, and their overall quality of life has changed for the better: My apartment has never been cleaner, better looking, and feels mostly stress free. Thank you for signing up to the Penguin Newsletter. Creating the Next Industrial Revolution Would you like to tell us about a lower price? By using our website you agree to our use of cookies. Ashlee Piper. In her book, Johnson also talks about toxic relationships and wasting time with people that do not bring any joy to your life.

All you need is baking soda and white vinegar.